VJing: Engaging Ugandan youth in Technology for Development

I really like this idea. In Public Health, the approach is always ‘community-based’ focused, meaning use what the community is comfortable with to put your message across. No need to adapt colonial structures of impressing upon people i.e. coming in and using what YOU are used to in the Western world to try and get behavior change or public health messages across. Really appreciate the approach highlighted in this article – using local culture to share public health messages…

Stories of UNICEF Innovation

Surrounded by his peers from TLC Youth Center, Venas re-narrates, and in that sense, co-authors a cartoon show through VJing using the device, weDub, as connected to a TV. Photo credit: Tina L. Zeng / 2014 Surrounded by his peers from TLC Youth Center, Venas re-narrates, and in that sense, co-authors a cartoon show through VJing using the device, weDub, as connected to a TV. Photo credit: Tina L. Zeng / 2014

Venas shouted into the microphone, “UNICEF na ki?” and then a response from the crowd came bellowing back, “Na lo!”

At a youth center in the slum area of Kamwokya, Venas was performing a live dubbing of media content in the local language over a microphone. This is a style of entertainment popularly known as VJing in Uganda. VJs, short for Video Jockey, are professional performers that translate and narrate over foreign films in makeshift shacks all over the country.

But instead of Hollywood movies, youths at this youth center were VJing to re-narrate a UNICEF cartoon.

Venas used an electronic device called weDub, which enabled him to interrupt the…

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